Appendix: Additional Chapter Activities

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Chapter 1: the VARK Questionnaire (Version 7.8)

image

How Do I Learn Best?

Choose the answer which best explains your preference and circle the letter(s) next to it. Please circle more than one if a single answer does not match your perception. Leave blank any question that does not apply.

  1. You are helping someone who wants to go to your airport, the center of town or railway station. You would:
    1. go with her.
    2. tell her the directions.
    3. write down the directions.
    4. draw, or show her a map, or give her a map.
  2. A website has a video showing how to make a special graph. There is a person speaking, some lists and words describing what to do and some diagrams. You would learn most from:
    1. seeing the diagrams.
    2. listening.
    3. reading the words.
    4. watching the actions.
  3. You are planning a vacation for a group. You want some feedback from them about the plan. You would:
    1. describe some of the highlights they will experience.
    2. use a map to show them the places.
    3. give them a copy of the printed itinerary.
    4. phone, text or email them.
  4. You are going to cook something as a special treat. You would:
    1. cook something you know without the need for instructions.
    2. ask friends for suggestions.
    3. look on the Internet or in some cookbooks for ideas from the pictures.
    4. use a good recipe.
  5. A group of tourists want to learn about the parks or wildlife reserves in your area. You would:
    1. talk about, or arrange a talk for them about parks or wildlife reserves
    2. show them maps and internet pictures.
    3. take them to a park or wildlife reserve and walk with them.
    4. give them a book or pamphlets about the parks or wildlife reserves.
  6. You are about to purchase a digital camera or mobile phone. Other than price, what would most influence your decision?
    1. Trying or testing it.
    2. Reading the details or checking its features online.
    3. It is a modern design and looks good.
    4. The salesperson telling me about its features.
  7. Remember a time when you learned how to do something new. Avoid choosing a physical skill, eg. riding a bike. You learned best by:
    1. watching a demonstration.
    2. listening to somebody explaining it and asking questions.
    3. diagrams, maps, and charts – visual clues.
    4. written instructions – e.g. a manual or book.
  8. You have a problem with your heart. You would prefer that the doctor:
    1. gave you a something to read to explain what was wrong.
    2. used a plastic model to show what was wrong.
    3. described what was wrong.
    4. showed you a diagram of what was wrong.
  9. You want to learn a new program, skill or game on a computer. You would:
    1. read the written instructions that came with the program.
    2. talk with people who know about the program.
    3. use the controls or keyboard.
    4. follow the diagrams in the book that came with it.
  10. I like websites that have:
    1. things I can click on, shift or try.
    2. interesting design and visual features.
    3. interesting written descriptions, lists and explanations.
    4. audio channels where I can hear music, radio programs or interviews.
  11. Other than price, what would most influence your decision to buy a new non-fiction book?
    1. The way it looks is appealing.
    2. Quickly reading parts of it.
    3. A friend talks about it and recommends it.
    4. It has real-life stories, experiences and examples.
  12. You are using a book, CD or website to learn how to take photos with your new digital camera. You would like to have:
    1. a chance to ask questions and talk about the camera and its features.
    2. clear written instructions with lists and bullet points about what to do.
    3. diagrams showing the camera and what each part does.
    4. many examples of good and poor photos and how to improve them.
  13. Do you prefer a teacher or a presenter who uses:
    1. demonstrations, models or practical sessions.
    2. question and answer, talk, group discussion, or guest speakers.
    3. handouts, books, or readings.
    4. diagrams, charts or graphs.
  14. You have finished a competition or test and would like some feedback. You would like to have feedback:
    1. using examples from what you have done.
    2. using a written description of your results.
    3. from somebody who talks it through with you.
    4. using graphs showing what you had achieved.
  15. You are going to choose food at a restaurant or cafe. You would:
    1. choose something that you have had there before.
    2. listen to the waiter or ask friends to recommend choices.
    3. choose from the descriptions in the menu.
    4. look at what others are eating or look at pictures of each dish
  16. You have to make an important speech at a conference or special occasion. You would:
    1. make diagrams or get graphs to help explain things.
    2. write a few key words and practice saying your speech over and over.
    3. write out your speech and learn from reading it over several times.
    4. gather many examples and stories to make the talk real and practical.

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The VARK Questionnaire Scoring Chart

Use the following scoring chart to find the VARK category that each of your answers corresponds to. Circle the letters that correspond to your answers

e.g. If you answered b and c for question 3, circle V and R in the question 3 row.

Scoring Chart

Question

a category

b category

c category

d category

1

K

A

R

V

2

V

A

R

K

3

K

V

R

A

4

K

A

V

R

5

A

V

K

R

6

K

R

V

A

7

K

A

V

R

8

R

K

A

V

9

R

A

K

V

10

K

V

R

A

11

V

R

A

K

12

A

R

V

K

13

K

A

R

V

14

K

R

A

V

15

K

A

R

V

16

V

A

R

K

Calculating your scores

Total number of Vs circled =

Total number of As circled =

Total number of Rs circled =

Total number of Ks circled =

Count the number of each of the VARK letters you have circled to get your score for each VARK category.

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Chapter 2.1: SMART Goals

SMART Goals

Specific

Measurable

Achievable

Relevant

Time-bound

Goal Setting

1. Write down 4 goals you want to achieve.

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

2. Pick one goal from above: _____________________________________

Break your goal into smaller steps that are measurable and time-bound.

Step

Time Needed

Deadline

3. What resources will you need in order to accomplish this goal?

_____________________________________________________________________________________

4. What obstacles might get in the way? What can you do to overcome those obstacles?

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

5. Create weekly or daily tasks you can do to help you achieve your goal.

Task

Daily or Weekly Task?

6. How will you know you have achieved this goal? What will it look like?

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

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Chapter 2.2: Time-boxing

Using the table on the following page, box in your class schedule, weekly meetings, and work schedule. Find free spaces to incorporate study time.

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

7:00
7:30
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
5:30
6:00
6:30
7:00
7:30
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30

Chapter 3.1: Cornell Notes Template

Practice taking Cornell Notes with this template and an excerpt from a textbook or a YouTube video.

CORNELL NOTES

Topic:

Course:

Date:

Questions/Main Ideas

Notes

Summary:

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Chapter 3.2: Verbal and Visual Memory

Watch YouTube video How to Memorize Fast and Easily and complete the two memory challenges.

Challenge 1 Verbal Memory

After the words are called out, write down all the words you remember.

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

 

Challenge 2 Visual Memory

After the words are explained, write down all the words you remember.

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

Which was better, your verbal memory or your visual memory?

_____________________________________________________________________________

Explain your results. How can you use this visual memory technique? Do you think it will help you? Why/why not?

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

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Chapter 3.3: Brainstorming Web

Practice note taking using this web and an excerpt from a textbook or a YouTube video.

 

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Chapter 4.1: Critical Thinking

Critical Thinking: Crime and Punishment

Read the following and use critical thinking to analyze.

In 1974, at the age of 19, Doris Drugdealer was arrested for selling $200 worth of heroin to an undercover police officer in Michigan. She received a 10-20 year prison sentence for this crime. After serving about 8 months of her sentence, she decided that she could not tolerate prison and with the help of her grandfather, plotted an escape. She used a work pass to walk away from prison. In May, 2008, after 34 years, Doris was captured again by detectives who matched fingerprints from her driver’s license to her prison records.

Doris said that in 1974 she was a “stupid little …hippie-ish girl…a pothead.” During the 34 years that Doris evaded prison, she worried every day that she would be caught. While looking at a sunset, she would marvel at her freedom and wonder if the past would catch up with her. She was very careful to lead the life of a model citizen and even volunteered for Common Cause, an organization that promotes government ethics and accountability. She married an executive and had three children and lived a comfortable life in an upper middle class neighborhood in California. She never told her family about her past. Her husband of 23 years stated that he loved his wife as much as the day they were married and that she was a “person of the highest integrity and compassion” and had dedicated her life to raising her children. She taught her children to be responsible citizens and to avoid drugs. Her husband said that the arrest “was the next worst thing to having a death in the family.” Doris worried about the effect of her arrest on her son who had just graduated from high school and her older daughters. A neighbor commented that it would not be useful to society to send Doris back to prison.

Undercover drug officers believed that Doris had connections to “higher ups” in the drug world and was a teenage leader in a 1070’s drug ring. They found $600 in her apartment, paraphernalia for cutting heroin and pictures of her with other drug dealers. Doris described herself as a recent high school graduate who was strapped for cash, working at a minimum wage job and driving a $400 car. She said that every day of her life she regretted getting herself into this situation. She was extradited back to Michigan to serve her original prison term. Her family and friends submitted a plea for clemency to the governor of Michigan. Should the governor grant her clemency?

1. Describe the values and points of view of:

  • Doris

    ______________________________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________________________

     ______________________________________________________________________________________

  • Her family

    ______________________________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________________________

     ______________________________________________________________________________________

  • Her neighbors

    ______________________________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________________________

     ______________________________________________________________________________________

  • Society/The Law

    ______________________________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________________________

     ______________________________________________________________________________________

2. After considering all points of view, what is your point of view on the situation?

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

 

This exercise is based on excerpts from “Former Fugitive Drawing Sympathy” and “Captured Fugitive Now Waiting for Extradition, and to Learn Fate” from the San Diego Union Tribune, May 1 and 2, 2008, and CollegeScope/College and Career Success by Dr. Marsha Fralick

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Chapter 4.2: Creative Thinking

Brainstorming

Use your creativity and imagination to answer the following questions. Think of as many as you can in 5 minutes.

1. How is a peanut like you?

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

 ______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

Circle your best 3 and share with the group.

 

The next question can be done as a group.

2. How is a peanut like going to college?

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

 

Activity modified from CollegeScope/College and Career Success by Dr. Marsha Fralick

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Chapter 4.3: Vocabulary Builder

Write down new words you encounter during reading.

Word: _________________________

Sentence the word was used in:

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

Pieces of the word that look familiar and may help define it (root word or prefixes/suffixes):

______________________________________________________________________________________

Definition of the word:

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

Make a new sentence using the word.

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

A visual to help remember the word:

Try to incorporate the new word into conversation today.

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Chapter 5.1: Weekly Study Plan

Write down what you need to accomplish this week and how long it will take. You can use a separate page for each course or put them on one page and color code each class. Assign priority to each task using A, B, C, or 1, 2, 3.

What do you NEED to do today?

How long will it take?

TOTAL amount of time needed. What did you ACCOMPLISH today?
Day 1

 

 

 

Day 2

 

 

 

Day3

 

 

 

Day4

 

 

 

Day 5

 

 

 

Need assistance with creating a study plan? Contact an Academic Coach at the Learning Center www.lc.soar.ttu.edu or 806.742.3664

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Chapter 5.2: Academic Integrity

Read over the following scenarios with your group. Decide if the situation violates academic integrity and why/why not?

1. You missed a week of classes because you were not feeling well. Your course only allows you four absences. You didn’t see a doctor this time, but you have a doctor’s excuse from a previous illness. You decide to alter the previous doctor’s excuse and use it for the current situation.

2. You have an assignment due that requires you to collect survey data from 100 students and write a report based on your results. You only collected 25 surveys. You believe, based on the law of averages, that the results from the 25 surveys will basically be the same as results you would obtain from 100 surveys, so you make-up the rest of the data.

3. Your essay is due tomorrow morning and you are running out of time. You find a paper on the internet that is similar to your assignment requirements. You make a few minor changes in the wording of the paper and turn it in without citing.

4. You are taking an online course and have a quiz due at midnight. You completely forgot about it, and you have to go to work. You give your friend, who is not in the course, your notes and login information and ask her to take the quiz for you.

5. A student that sits near you has missed a week due to the flu. When he comes back he asks to borrow your lecture notes so you meet him after class in the library.

6. You wrote a paper last year that is similar to one needed for a current assignment. You plan on copying a few sentences from your old paper into the new paper.

7. You turn in a one-page paper for a daily assignment and your TA notices that you did not cite any of your material. You did not know you needed to cite your sources on a short daily assignment. You believe that since it was unintentional you should only receive a warning.

8. In your course, working with a group is encouraged but it is required that your assignments be written on your own and not a collaboration. You get together with three other students to discuss the assignment. Each person writes notes regarding the discussion and then writes their own responses.

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Chapter 6.1: Email Etiquette

Read the following email written to a professor. Discuss with your group the mistakes made in this email and how it could be written more appropriately.

Hey Sir,

I didn’t go to class today. I was throwing up and didn’t think it was a good idea to sit in you’re class. LOL I need notes from todays lecture so I don’t fail. Let me know when I can come by and pick them up. Oh, BTW, can you check and see if I’m failing right now?

Student

 

1. What mistakes did this student make when communicating with a professor?

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

2. Correct the email and rewrite it.

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

3. With your group, write an email you could send to a professor.

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

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Chapter 6.2: Stereotypes

List as many stereotypes as you can think of that relate to the following groups.

 

Student Athlete

 

 

Fraternity/Sorority members

 

 

LGBTQ

 

 

People from rural areas/farms

 

 

Physically /Mentally Disabled

 

 

Muslim

 

 

Christian

 

 

Discussion

1. How are stereotypes formed?

2. Can stereotypes differ based on where you come from?

3. Can there be a “good” stereotype?

4. How can stereotyping be harmful?

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Chapter 7.1: Stress and Wellness

The key to managing stress is to recognize it and make a plan. Read the following list of possible stressors and develop a plan for your top 5.

Stressor

Finances

Being Away From Home

Fitting In, Meeting New People

Dealing with Roommates

Coursework and Exams

Family Issues

Work Schedule

Social Obligations

Health Issues

Romantic Relationships

 

How Can I Reduce These Stressors?

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

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Wellness Goals

Living a healthy lifestyle can assist in managing your stress. Getting enough sleep, eating regular healthy meals, and exercising are just a few ways to stay well. Think about your wellness goals for this semester.

My wellness goal is to: __________________________________________________________________

1. What steps can take to achieve your wellness goal?

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

2. Why is this goal important to achieve, how will it help you?

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

3. How will you know you have achieved this goal? What will your achievement look like?

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Need extra assistance with Stress and Wellness, find out more at The Student Counseling Center www.depts.ttu.edu/scc/ 806.742.3674.

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Chapter 7.2: Food and Exercise Log

Keep track of your meals, water intake, exercise, and sleep habits for 3 days. Also keep track of how you felt that day.

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Breakfast

Snack

Lunch

Snack

Dinner

Snack

8 oz Servings of Water

Exercise

Hours of Sleep

Mood

After monitoring for 3 days:

  • What good habits do you have already?
  • What new habits do you need to form?

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Chapter 8.1: Monthly Budget

Projected Amount Actual Amount Difference
Income
Money from parents
Work
Financial Aid/Scholarships after tuition
Total
Fixed Expenses
Rent
Car payment/insurance
Cell phone
Other ____________
Total
Amount Remaining
Flexible Expenses
Food, outside of meal plan
Gas
Entertainment
Clothing
Other ___________
Total
Amount Leftover

Need extra help with budgets?

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Chapter 8.2: Majors and Careers

Trying to figure out what major/career is best for you? Answer these questions and take the career assessments listed below.

1. What do you love to do in your free time? What types of volunteering have you done or would like to do?

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

2. What skills come naturally to you without thought or effort?

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

3. What careers do you think you would enjoy doing?

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

4. What goals to have? How will your career help you fulfill those goals?

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

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Career Assessments

FOCUS will help you develop an accurate picture of your personal strengths, needs, and preferences; and connect you with exact majors here at Texas Tech University.

Create your FOCUS account today at: https://www.focus2career.com/Portal/Login.cfm?SID=393

Access Code: redraider

TypeFocus Careers will assist you in identifying your “type” of individual out of 16 identified “types”. This assessment will assist you in discovering your “personal environmental fit” in the workplace and assist you with information you may utilize in career selection.

Create your login using the following link: https://v6.typefocus.com/beforelogin/home/n/cmVkcmFpZGVycw

StrengthsQuest® is a revolutionary program from the Gallup Organization that focuses on students’ strengths rather than weaknesses. By taking this online assessment, individuals are able to discover their natural talents, strategically choose a successful career path, conquer job and internship interviews, and gain a better understanding of what they do best.

To take the assessment, go to www.strengthsquest.ttu.edu.

Strong Interest Inventory is The most scientifically sound, thoroughly researched, and widely used interest inventory, compares your pattern of responses to a pattern of responses of people of different types in different occupations.

  • This assessment requires interpretation by a professional. To take this assessment you must contact the University Career Center.

The University Career Center has professional staff  who are ready to discuss your career options anytime. For ideas on what you can do with your major: Call now for an appointment – 806-742-2210

Or Visit: http://www.depts.ttu.edu/careercenter/careerexploration/index.php 

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